The Graduate Colloquium

 The Graduate Colloquium is a colloquium-style series for mathematics graduate students to share their current ideas with the rest of their colleagues. Interspersed within are talks and panels focused on career development.

If you're interested in speaking in the graduate colloquium during the Spring 2018 semester, please contact Alicia Lamarche.

Spring 2018 Schedule

Date Speaker Title
Tuesday
Jan 30
Jesse Kass How to use matrices to find zeros
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Feb 6
Patrick McFaddin Twisted Linear Algebra
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Feb 13
Jinjin Liang Support Vector Machine Classification
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Feb 27
Matthew Boylan
Doug Meade
Matt Miller
Q & A on Department External Review
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Thursday
Mar 8
Zhiyu Wang The method of hypergraph containers and its applications
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Mar 20
Mohammed Alabbood TBA
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Mar 27
Various An Invitation to Upcoming Graduate Courses
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Apr 3
Keller Vandebogert Random Polygon to Ellipse
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Apr 10
Harsh Mehta Integral Ideas in Analytic Number Theory
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Apr 17
TBA TBA
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday
Apr 24
Panel Everything you always wanted to know about exams (but were afraid to ask)
locationLeConte 412 @ 4:30pm-5:30pm


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Abstracts


Jesse Kass -- How to use matrices to find zeros

A basic math problem is, how to count the real zeros of a polynomial efficiently (no factoring!)? In the 19th century, Jacobi and Borchardt and… proved that the count can be computed using matrix methods. I’ll explain this classical result, show its relation to the topological degree, and then pose the problem of establishing an analogous relation with more complicated degrees in modern algebraic topology.

Patrick McFaddin -- Twisted Linear Algebra

Central simple algebras are a direct generalization of matrix algebras and the study of such objects can be viewed as linear algebra over division rings - fields with not necessarily commutative multiplication. The study of central simple algebras began in the 1930's by Brauer, Noether, Hasse, and Albert, and since then applications have abounded: e.g. class field theory, Galois descent, motivic cohomology. In this talk, I will give a soft introduction to central simple algebras and the Brauer group of a field and discuss some open problems.

Jinjin Liang -- Support Vector Machine Classification

Support Vector Machine (SVM) is an efficient algorithm in data mining, and has been widely used in various areas, such as economics, medical science, social sciences, etc. It separates two kinds of samples by an optimal classification hyperplane, which is determined by the solution to a quadratic program, thus has advantages of few parameters, global optimization, and high precision.

In this talk, I will first present the theory foundation and basic concepts, to make SVM easy to understand. Then I will talk about my research on Support Vector Domain Description as a reformulation of SVM. Also, the possible application area will be discussed. No prior knowledge is assumed.

Jinjin Liang obtained her PhD degree in Applied Mathematics at 2009 from Xidian University in China, then worked at Xi’an Shiyou University, and is now an associate Professor in School of Sciences. She has 12 years researching experiences on optimization theory and applications, her research focuses on Support Vector Machine using pre extraction strategy and optimization method

Matthew Boylan, Doug Meade, and Matt Miller -- Q and A on Department External Review

Upper administration (e.g., Deans, Provost) at institutions of higher education require their academic units to undergo periodic external reviews. To prepare for an external review, academic units prepare a report (self study) summing up the state of the unit. The administration then invites outside experts (external reviewers) to visit the unit. The external reviewers read the self study, talk to faculty and students, and submit a written report to university administrators. Our department will be hosting external reviewers the week of March 19 – 23. In advance of their arrival, we would like to take the opportunity to inform you about the process and to answer any questions that you may have.

Zhiyu Wang -- The method of hypergraph containers and its applications

I will attempt to give a brief introduction to the method of hypergraph containers (developed by Jozsef Balogh, Robert Morris, Wojciech Samotij and independently by Saxton and Thomason) for bounding the number of finite objects with forbidden substructures. It allows one to prove enumerative, structural and extremal results in a wide variety of settings. We will discuss some of its applications in extremal graph theory, additive combinatorics and discrete geometry.

Various -- An Invitation to Upcoming Graduate Courses

Various professors will give meet-and-greet talks for what to expect in their courses coming up in the fall. Everyone is welcome.

Keller Vandebogert -- Random Polygon to Ellipse

Consider any random polygon. We can make a new polygon by connecting the midpoints of the original and rescaling by an appropriate factor. Iterating this process yields a curious result: the sequence of polygons will tend to an ellipse oriented at 45 degrees (check out https://www.jasondavies.com/random-polygon-ellipse/ to see it happen in real time). In this talk I will go over the surprisingly elementary mathematics behind this result, and outline a proof of the more general result; namely, instead of doing the above transformation with midpoints, we can take any point of division of the segments of our polygon and we will still get a polygon oriented at 45 degrees.

Harsh Mehta -- Integral Ideas in Analytic Number Theory

We talk about important applications of integration in analytic number theory, essentially, about a theorem of Perron, a theorem of Mellin and the circle method.

Panel -- Everything you always wanted to know about exams (but were afraid to ask)

Graduate students in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th year will talk about their experiences with qualifying and comprehensive exams and answer questions.


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More Departmental Happenings





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Previous Colloquia


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